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1341 Clark Street
Cambridge, OH 43725

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News & Events

Our online newsroom is your primary source for information about all that’s happening here at Southeastern Med. You can also subscribe to our e-newsletter and get updates sent right to your inbox.

Volunteer Week at Southeastern Med

Volunteers-sm-250pxSoutheastern Med is truly a community hospital. More than 150 volunteers contribute thousands of hours to the hospital every year.

This week, we'll be honoring our dedicated volunteer team for everything they do to serve the needs of our patients and visitors. The hospital departments will set out tokens of appreciation to give to our volunteers as they make their rounds, and on April 8th we'll host our annual Volunteer Recognition Dinner. Volunteers will receive awards based on the number of hours they've contributed over the last year, and hospital management will serve them a lovely sit-down dinner.

Volunteers at Southeastern Med are crucial to the operations of the hospital. If you've ever been to the hospital, you've probably encountered at least a dozen of them. They man the information desk. They discharge patients and take samples to the lab. They deliver mail and flowers to patients. They manage interoffice mail and deliver supplies to the departments as needed. They work in the gift shop. They check in patients arriving for outpatient or surgical procedures. They also shuttle patients from the parking area to the hospital, and much, much more.

We couldn't provide the quality, personalized care you've come to expect from this hospital without our community of volunteers. If you've got extra time or talent on your hands, we'd love to have you join us! For information about becoming a volunteer, contact Diane at 740-439-8147 or via email at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. .

Antibiotic Use

pills-225pxThere is no doubt that antibiotics save lives; however, misuse of antibiotics can result in resistant infections and deadly diarrhea called Clostridium difficile.

New data from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) show that Clostridium difficile is the top germ leading to healthcare-associated infections.

The CDC also released another report on improving antibiotic use among hospitalized patients, which includes recommendations and opportunities to improve the use of antibiotics as well as increase patient safety through the appropriate use and prescription of antibiotics.  

Read more...

Area Nurses Achieve 20 Years CCRN Certification

CCRN Certification2During a hospital visit, nothing is more reassuring than the compassion and superior care provided by healthcare staff.

Diligence to exceptional patient care and dedication to continuing professional education makes the nurses at Southeastern Med excellent in providing high-quality, comprehensive, patient-centered healthcare to our local community.

Christine Forshey, Angie Gibson, Rita Mellott, and Beth Wick, nurses at Southeastern Med, recently received national recognition for reaching a significant milestone in the nursing profession. Since 1993, they have consistently maintained the CCRN certification. The certification is a credential granted through the American Association of Critical-Care Nurses (AACN) Certification Corporation.

A critical care nurse an expert in nursing care of acutely and/or critically ill patients. The recognized nurses from Southeastern Med are included in a group of 1,489 CCRNs being honored this year by the corporation and the AACN for 20 years of continuous certification.

“CCRN is one of the hardest certifications to obtain in the nursing profession. It takes great experience, advanced knowledge and perseverance. This is a testament to the loyalty and hard work that these ladies exemplify,” said Michael Campbell, Director of Critical Care Services at Southeastern Med.

Read more...

Healthy Choices on the Go

salad1Do you find it hard to cook three meals a day? Is your schedule so busy that it's difficult to make healthy choices? 

Sometimes, it’s a lot easier to go out for breakfast or lunch because we just don’t have enough time to make breakfast in the morning or pack a lunch for the day, but eating out frequently can lead to bad habits in our diet and cause future health problems.

Even with a busy lifestyle, we can still make smart choices that lead to better health.

Planning ahead and preparing your meals in advance can be helpful. Take a few minutes each night to set aside your breakfast and pack your lunch for the next day.

According to ChooseMyPlate.gov, meals should consist of 50% fruits and vegetables, 25% protein and 25% percent grains. It is important to choose lean sources of protein such as chicken, turkey or fish, and whole grains such as whole wheat bread and brown rice.

Here are a few ideas for a quick and healthy breakfast:

  • Whole wheat toast with peanut butter and a banana
  • Fruit smoothie
  • Yogurt with fruit and nuts
  • Cottage cheese with fruit
  • Breakfast burrito with eggs, reduced-fat cheese, and vegetables wrapped in a whole wheat tortilla

And here are some tasty suggestions for a convenient, healthy lunch:

  • Whole-wheat pita with mixed greens, grilled chicken and light Caesar dressing, baby carrots, and a piece of fruit
  • Salmon lettuce wraps with light sesame Asian dressing, whole grain crackers, low-fat plain yogurt mixed with an orange
  • Tomato and cucumber salad with reduced-fat feta cheese, olive oil and vinegar, and tuna salad on whole-wheat bread, and an apple
  • Grilled chicken on a bed of romaine with shredded carrots, reduced-fat cheese and light vinaigrette, and a pear
  • Garden salad with canned or leftover salmon, tomato, cucumber and light vinaigrette, a whole grain roll, a bunch of grapes, and a glass of skim milk

These are just a few options that taste great and are easy to grab on the go. Even with a busy lifestyle, you can still make good food choices every day that will lead to a healthier lifestyle.

These tips brought to you by Mike Banchek, a student of dietary sciences at Stark State College.

 

Five Tips for Healthy Flavor

spicesResearch shows that taste is the biggest reason people choose one food over another, but healthy food doesn't have to taste like cardboard.

Here are five tips for adding more flavor to your meals while maintaining their healthy profile.

1. Keep time. Spices and dried herbs are only as good as their shelf life. This chart details the optimum storage time for spices in a variety of forms.

 

Seasoning Storage Time

 Whole 2-5 years
 Ground Spices 6 months – 2 years
 Leafy Herbs 3 months – 2 years
 Dehydrated Vegetables 6 months

 

2. Bring on the condiments. Add flavor with quality condiments, such as horseradish, flavored mustard, chutney, tapenade, or salsa.

3. Get smoking. Grill vegetables or roast them in a 450° oven to give them a sweet, smoky flavor. For added flavor, brush them lightly with oil and season with herbs such as dill or garlic.

4. Add garlic. Garlic can help lower high blood pressure and relieve the symptoms of atherosclerosis. Include it when sautéing vegetables, add it to pasta sauces, or include it in marinades.

5. Pep it up with peppers! Use red, green and yellow peppers of all varieties – sweet, hot and dried – to round out the flavor of any dish. A dash of red pepper flakes will kick up the spice factor, and could also relieve headaches and joint pain.

How to you add flavor to your favorite dishes?

Chelsea pp1

  

 

 

These tips brought to you by Chelsea Masters, Registered Dietician, Licensed Dietician.

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